Tag Archives: TSX:ENGH

5 Canadian Dividend Stocks with Incredible Dividend Growth

The Canadian Dividend Aristocrat list is a good place to explore prospective dividend stocks for buying. There are dividend stocks that grow their dividends at an incredible pace. Ideally, we aim to focus on dividend stocks with long-term growth trends.

Typically, the longer the dividend growth streak of a dividend stock, the better. But you’ve got to investigate its business and determine if more above-average growth is coming. And make sure you pay a reasonable multiple for the stock.

grow dividends

You can observe the one- and three-year dividend growth rates (DGR) to get an idea of recent dividend increases. Also, look at the five- and 10-year DGR. The 10-year rate will likely include a recession, which provides a glimpse of how resilient the business might be during tough economic times. Dig into the year(s) of recession for the real resilience of the business.

Here are some of the top Canadian Dividend Aristocrats with incredible five-year DGR. Stocks with high dividend growth tend to have small yields. (Typically, you would find blue-chip Canadian dividend-growth stocks growing dividends in the 5-7%. It would be amazing to find one growing its dividend at 10%.)

Dividend stockDG streak5-year DGRRecent Yield
goeasy (TSX:GSY)635.1%1.6%
Agnico Eagle Mines (TSX:AEM)(NYSE:AEM)524.3%2.3%
Savaria (TSX:SIS)822.4%2.4%
Canadian Pacific Railway (TSX:CP)(NYSE:CP)520.5%0.8%
Enghouse Systems (TSX:ENGH)1419.1%1.1%

Source: Data for DG streak and 5-year DGR columns are from the Canadian Dividend All-Star list. Data for Recent Yield column is from Yahoo Finance.

We believe by going through many examples, investors can better identify the type of dividend stocks to invest in for long-term buy and hold or potentially sizing a position accordingly for trading. Here are five dividend stock examples.

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Dividend Stock Portfolio Building: How Big Should Your Stock Position Be?

You build a dividend stock portfolio one stock at a time. But how much should you buy the stock of a quality company until you stop? 

You might stop when the stock is no longer attractively priced or when you’ve bought a big enough position.

If you are relatively new to investing, you might be confused about these terms: “starter position”, “partial position”, and “full position”. I’ll explain them real soon (in the section after the next one).

Dividend Stock Portfolio Building Examples

Portfolio building is about spreading risks. You might refrain from buying more than 25% of your stock portfolio in a sector or 5% in a stock. For example, banks, insurance, and asset managers fall under the financial services sector. 

Under the 25% rule, these holdings cannot make up more than 25% of your portfolio when you make purchases. Under the 5% rule, you won’t have more than 5% in Royal Bank of Canada (TSX:RY)(NYSE:RY) or Brookfield Asset Management (TSX:BAM.A)(NYSE:BAM) when you buy their shares.

You might also limit how much you invest in a dividend stock by the yield it provides. For example, a high-yield dividend stock that pays a 10% yield could be risky. If so, you might only limit it to contribute to only 1% of your annualized income. It could be a great move to just avoid risky, high-yield stocks altogether. 

Not all high-yield stocks are risky. You’ll need to perform fundamental analysis on potential ideas to determine if they’re risky or not, given the economic condition or situation at the time. During a market crash, a nice bunch of quality dividend stocks could provide nice yields of 5-10%.

Here’s a concrete example. A new $11,000 dividend portfolio that’s focused on growth (or dividend growth) might look like this with $1,000 invested in each of the following:

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A Canadian Dividend Aristocrat in the Making?!

A Canadian Dividend Aristocrat typically refers to a TSX stock that has increased its dividend for at least five years. Ever wonder what a Canadian Dividend Aristocrat must be like before it actually becomes one?

Let’s rewind a bit. The stock must pay its first dividend and after that, be able to continue increasing its dividend year after year. Therefore, it should generate stable (ideally growing) earnings. 

I believe I have a stock here that is a Canadian Dividend Aristocrat in the making. However, I’m probably way ahead in this thinking because it’ll likely take years before it will pay its first dividend.

Why do I hold shares of this stock now if it pays no dividend? …because if I’m right, this stock is going to give me a whole lot of capital gains before it initiates a dividend. 

Right now, this small-cap stock has better places to allocate its capital. It was no April Fool’s joke when it announced another acquisition on Thursday, which drove the stock price 13% higher. 

Source: Yahoo Finance – TSX:CTS’s April 1, 2021 price action
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