Tag Archives: NASDAQ:CMCSA

Dividend Stock Portfolio Building: How Big Should Your Stock Position Be?

You build a dividend stock portfolio one stock at a time. But how much should you buy the stock of a quality company until you stop? 

You might stop when the stock is no longer attractively priced or when you’ve bought a big enough position.

If you are relatively new to investing, you might be confused about these terms: “starter position”, “partial position”, and “full position”. I’ll explain them real soon (in the section after the next one).

Dividend Stock Portfolio Building Examples

Portfolio building is about spreading risks. You might refrain from buying more than 25% of your stock portfolio in a sector or 5% in a stock. For example, banks, insurance, and asset managers fall under the financial services sector. 

Under the 25% rule, these holdings cannot make up more than 25% of your portfolio when you make purchases. Under the 5% rule, you won’t have more than 5% in Royal Bank of Canada (TSX:RY)(NYSE:RY) or Brookfield Asset Management (TSX:BAM.A)(NYSE:BAM) when you buy their shares.

You might also limit how much you invest in a dividend stock by the yield it provides. For example, a high-yield dividend stock that pays a 10% yield could be risky. If so, you might only limit it to contribute to only 1% of your annualized income. It could be a great move to just avoid risky, high-yield stocks altogether. 

Not all high-yield stocks are risky. You’ll need to perform fundamental analysis on potential ideas to determine if they’re risky or not, given the economic condition or situation at the time. During a market crash, a nice bunch of quality dividend stocks could provide nice yields of 5-10%.

Here’s a concrete example. A new $11,000 dividend portfolio that’s focused on growth (or dividend growth) might look like this with $1,000 invested in each of the following:

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How to Create a Passive Income Portfolio

To create a passive income portfolio, you can invest in bonds or stocks that generate interest or dividend income without you having to lift a finger. I prefer to invest in stocks which have outperformed bonds in the long run.

I also like the concept of investing in stocks because I’m owning stakes in businesses and benefiting from their profits (although I also take on their risks). This is markedly different from purchasing bonds for which you’re lending your money to governments or corporations for interests in return.

In fact, dividend investing is my favorite way to generate passive income. There are so many safe dividend stocks to choose from. Even in a booming stock market like today, you can still find quality businesses at good valuations.

Here’s how to create a passive dividend income portfolio:

  • Buy stocks that offer safe dividends at good valuations
  • Diversify but don’t di-worsify
  • Aim for a low-maintenance portfolio that’s replicable, scalable, and can be largely automated
grow a money tree

Buy stocks that offer safe dividends

The U.S. and Canadian stock markets offer yields of 1.8% and 2.8%, respectively. There are plenty of safe dividend stocks that offer higher yields of about 3-6%.

However, typically, the higher the yield of a stock, the slower its dividend growth will be. (Sometimes, high yielders don’t increase their dividends.) Similarly, low yield stocks tend to increase their dividends faster. Typically, dividend growth stocks are safer and better than stocks that simply maintain their dividends.

Buy stocks at good valuations to protect your invested capital and maximize your gains.

Here are a few examples.

A high yield example

NorthWest Healthcare Properties REIT (TSX:NWH.UN) owns a high quality portfolio of medical office buildings and hospital properties in major markets in Canada, Brazil, Germany, The Netherlands, Australia, and New Zealand.

The healthcare REIT generates stable cash flows from having a high occupancy of about 96% and a weighted average lease expiry of 13 years. Additionally, it gets organic growth from having more than 70% of its net operating income indexed to inflation. It also has CAD$370 million projects in its development pipeline that’ll also add to growth.

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Top U.S. Dividend Growth Stocks for January

The U.S. stock market, using SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust (NYSE:SPY) as a proxy, has bounced about 8% from a low in December. The ETF has some strong resistance at the US$270 range. It needs to break that range and make a new high to indicate that the correction that started in October won’t continue.

technical chart showing SPY bouncing from Dec 2018 low
Source: Stockcharts

Despite the market rebounding, there are still some good-value quality U.S. dividend growth stocks for long-term investing. Here are two out of seven top U.S. dividend ideas I wrote about here in December. They’re still great buys today.

dividend income
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