Tag Archives: NYSE:O

1 Top Canadian REIT that Yields 4% to Buy Now

I was absolutely thrilled to find out about Canadian Net REIT (TSXV:NET) around April this year, which is about when I started buying the quality real estate investment trust (REIT) in my Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA). You might know the company, which is formerly known as Fronsac REIT (TSXV:FRO.UN).

I found the top-notch dividend stock when I was going through the Canadian Dividend All-Star List — you can obtain the latest version here. Just to be clear, I’m not affiliated with that website in any way. The author explains the list as “a free spreadsheet with an abundance of useful dividend screening information on Canadian companies that have increased their dividend for five or more years in a row.”

I haven’t found any similar company as Canadian Net REIT on the Canadian exchanges (yet). There are bigger versions of it on the NYSE though, including Realty Income (NYSE:O) and the like.

bananas in grocery store
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High Inflation: Beat It With Dividend Stocks!

High inflation is already upon us. As BBC News reported, the U.S. saw consumer prices jump 4.2% in the past 12 months. Price surges for certain goods can be even more ridiculous. Second-hand car prices rose 10% in April versus March. 

A part of that had to do with the shortage (and consequential price rise) in basic materials like steel. The situation is similar for other raw materials like copper and lumber.

We can say something similar for Canada as well — higher inflation and higher raw material costs. The annual inflation rate was 3.4% in Canada.

The Federal Reserve aims for a long-term inflation rate of 2%, as does the Bank of Canada. The Federal Reserve explains very well here how a stable rate of 2% helps with keeping maximum employment and consumer price stability. It further clarifies that an extended period of low inflation is likely to lead to a period of higher inflation (triggered by monetary policy), which is what we’re seeing now in both countries. 

At the very minimum, Americans and Canadians need to ensure their savings are earning at least 2% a year from interest income. Of course, we can do better than that with dividend stocks.

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How to Create a Passive Income Portfolio

To create a passive income portfolio, you can invest in bonds or stocks that generate interest or dividend income without you having to lift a finger. I prefer to invest in stocks which have outperformed bonds in the long run.

I also like the concept of investing in stocks because I’m owning stakes in businesses and benefiting from their profits (although I also take on their risks). This is markedly different from purchasing bonds for which you’re lending your money to governments or corporations for interests in return.

In fact, dividend investing is my favorite way to generate passive income. There are so many safe dividend stocks to choose from. Even in a booming stock market like today, you can still find quality businesses at good valuations.

Here’s how to create a passive dividend income portfolio:

  • Buy stocks that offer safe dividends at good valuations
  • Diversify but don’t di-worsify
  • Aim for a low-maintenance portfolio that’s replicable, scalable, and can be largely automated
grow a money tree

Buy stocks that offer safe dividends

The U.S. and Canadian stock markets offer yields of 1.8% and 2.8%, respectively. There are plenty of safe dividend stocks that offer higher yields of about 3-6%.

However, typically, the higher the yield of a stock, the slower its dividend growth will be. (Sometimes, high yielders don’t increase their dividends.) Similarly, low yield stocks tend to increase their dividends faster. Typically, dividend growth stocks are safer and better than stocks that simply maintain their dividends.

Buy stocks at good valuations to protect your invested capital and maximize your gains.

Here are a few examples.

A high yield example

NorthWest Healthcare Properties REIT (TSX:NWH.UN) owns a high quality portfolio of medical office buildings and hospital properties in major markets in Canada, Brazil, Germany, The Netherlands, Australia, and New Zealand.

The healthcare REIT generates stable cash flows from having a high occupancy of about 96% and a weighted average lease expiry of 13 years. Additionally, it gets organic growth from having more than 70% of its net operating income indexed to inflation. It also has CAD$370 million projects in its development pipeline that’ll also add to growth.

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