Top U.S. Dividend Growth Stocks for January

The U.S. stock market, using SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust (NYSE:SPY) as a proxy, has bounced about 8% from a low in December. The ETF has some strong resistance at the US$270 range. It needs to break that range and make a new high to indicate that the correction that started in October won’t continue.

technical chart showing SPY bouncing from Dec 2018 low
Source: Stockcharts

Despite the market rebounding, there are still some good-value quality U.S. dividend growth stocks for long-term investing. Here are two out of seven top U.S. dividend ideas I wrote about here in December. They’re still great buys today.

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Top Canadian Dividend Growth Stocks for January

Long-term investors should welcome the market correction that we’ve been experiencing. The Canadian market is down by about 11% in the last 12 months, creating opportunities to buy quality stocks at cheaper valuations.

Here are two out of seven top Canadian dividend ideas I wrote about here in December. They’re still excellent buys today. Both businesses actually report in U.S. dollars and trade on the U.S. market as well as on the TSX.

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What Should Celgene Shareholders Do In Light Of The Bristol-Myers Squibb Deal?

Celgene (NASDAQ:CELG) stock appreciated about 21% as of writing, as there was news that Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE:BMY) was acquiring Celgene for about $74 billion.

What Should Celgene Shareholders Do?

The news actually pushed Celgene stock meaningfully closer to its fair value, according to Thomson Reuters‘ mean 12-month target of $105. As of writing, Celgene is trading at $80.84. So, it doesn’t make sense to sell at the current levels, as there’s still about $14 (nearly 17%) of upside according to BMY’s current stock price.

At the same time, there’s a risk that if the deal breaks down, Celgene stock could come tumbling down.

If you bought Celgene in the $60s in December, you’re now sitting on some nice gains, and no one will blame you for securing and booking the profit.

For those who have a longer-term investment horizon, it may be worthwhile to wait it out. If BMY combines with Celgene, it could be a good thing, as it merges the quality biotech and pharma companies to make a more diversified firm. Moreover, BMY also offers a stable dividend to give immediate returns.

Investor Takeaway

BMY is getting a good deal here. It’s paying a low multiple for Celgene, which has a higher margin and higher growth rate – BMY’s recent net margin and consensus estimated growth rate are 6.5% and 11-12.8%, respectively, while Celgene’s are 19.6% and 19.5-19.8%. BMY also has a stronger balance sheet than Celgene. Assuming the deal goes through, I think BMY is a better buy here.

The above is an excerpt. Read the full article here: What Should Celgene Shareholders Do In Light Of The Bristol-Myers Squibb Deal?

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Disclosure: At the time of writing, the author owns CELG.

Disclaimer: I am not a certified financial advisor. This article is for educational purposes, so consult a financial advisor and or tax professional if necessary before making any investment decisions.

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